Culture and agency archer margaret s. Margaret Archer 2019-01-25

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Culture and Agency by Margaret Scotford Archer

culture and agency archer margaret s

Hence cultural discontinuities are theoretically discounted from this point of view which holds them unimportant because the'savage mind' discountenances them. Now in all such cases there seems to be a fundamental confusion between the 'grip of tradition5 which I do not denigrate and its source in the bindingness of the cultural logic. Archer 2000 Being Human: The Problem of Agency, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. On morphogenesis and morphostasis What has been said so far about advancing on this shapeless, seething and shifting thing that we call culture is that the most promising way of coming to grips with it exposing the patterning of processes and end-products within this flux is through the use of analytical dualism. If the standard view does not give us the noble savage it leaves us with the primitive cultural dope, unable to exploit the intricacies of his own Lebenswelt.

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Margaret Archer

culture and agency archer margaret s

Obviously I will have to demonstrate that a parallel distinction can be employed in the cultural realm. Whether we are talking about parental socialization of political indoctrination, the success achieved may reflect coercion rather than conviction. I am working on the manner in which human reflexivity serves to mediate between our personal concerns and our structural conditioning as the next stage in the above project. Unlike the elite, these actors are not responding to the power of precept alone but also to preceptual power. Porpora , Routledge, London, 2004; Making our Way through the World: Human Reflexivity and Social Mobility, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2007 ; Pursuing the Common Good: How Solidarity and Subsidiarity Can Work Together, Margaret S. The Myth surfaced intact in Functionalist thought, transmitted by Sorokin.

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Culture and Agency: The Place of Culture in Social Theory by Margaret Scotford Archer

culture and agency archer margaret s

The aim is obviously to see whether the same explanatory pay-off can be gained by using a parallel distinction in the cultural field. Partly this is because humankind does not necessarily notice inconsistency or unexceptionally find it intolerable individually we all give house-room to incompatible mental furnishings through intellectual idleness, patches of ignorance, nostalgia or closing the emotional shutters. In particular much of the text is devoted to examining the hunch that Lockwood's approach to the explanation of structural change might prove equally useful if it could be transferred to the cultural field. Here the properties of cultural systems and the properties of cultural interaction are conflated because they are presented as being so tightly constitutive of one another. What I am more concerned to stress is the odd affinity in this connection shared by those holding a diametrically opposed view of primitive mentality. The notion of 'hegemonic culture' and its offspring, the 'dominant-ideology5 thesis, embodied the same assumption about cultural coherence: certainly it was inspired by sectional interests, generally it distorted the nature of reality and undoubtedly the consensus it generated was the product of manipulation, but nevertheless mystification and misguidedness did not deny it the basic property of coherence shared equally by the Parsonian normative system.

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Culture and Agency (2nd ed.) by Margaret S. Archer (ebook)

culture and agency archer margaret s

Our very knowledge about it, our vested interests in reject- Preface ing it or retaining it and our objective capacities for changing it have already been distributed to us before the action starts. Thus in the previous three theses I have been sketching in how one might achieve this aim through conceptualizing culture in terms of parts and people and examining the interface between them. However, the coherence of the Cultural System may not derive from the harmonious integration of its parts as tends to be assumed for we have seen that harmony and interdependence need not be synonymous. There is the same tension to be resolved both theoretically and experientially between the fund of ideas which in a real sense we feel free to accept or reject, and the fact sometimes known but sometimes happening behind our backs that the pool itself has been restricted or contaminated and that our sensed freedoms can be more a matter of manipulated feelings than of genuine liberty. Acting to introduce and guide readers through these contributions, this book carries the potential to inform exciting and innovative sociological research.

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Culture and Agency by Margaret Scotford Archer

culture and agency archer margaret s

In other words, cultural poverty is like physical poverty - grinding. The most prominent example of central conflation is the theory of. Usually, however, these have been deprived of cultural significance through an easy acceptance of adaptive reintegration but, as Gellner argues, the implications of this view are unacceptably unrealistic It presumes that'there can be no syncretism, no doctrinal pluralism, no deep treason, no dramatic conversion or doctrinal oscillation, no holding of alternative belief systems up one's sleeve, ready for the opportune moment of betrayal'. Held in thrall by this archetype, theorists of various persuasions concerned themselves only with how to accommodate it in their theories; there was no questioning of whether it should be given house-room. Consequently there is no ready fund of analytical terms for designating the components of the cultural realm corresponding to those which delineate parts of the structural domain roles, organizations, institutions, systems, etc. Winner, with co-author Pierpaolo Donati, of the Cheryl Franck Memorial prize for the best book in Critical Realism, 2016. The suggestion is that this framework be transferred to the cultural field, using equivalent analytical phases i.

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Structure, culture and agency : selected papers of Margaret Archer (eBook, 2017) [refinery29.co.uk]

culture and agency archer margaret s

In a later alliance with Bhaskar and other critical realists, Archer developed her analysis of ontology see her Realist Social Theory: The Morphogenetic Approach, 1995. What does she mean by this? That is to say that given a relatively stable environment, individuals could largely live inductively from past contexts to future ones because they were engaged in unchanging activities. Fundamentally what is wrong with conflationary theorizing is that it prevents the interplay between' parts' and 'people' from being the foundation of cultural dynamics. Its usefulness will be briefly commended by reference to the increase in explanatory power which Lockwood gained in relation to social change by distinguishing between' social integration' and'system integration'. She studied at the , graduating B.

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Culture and Agency: The Place of Culture in Social Theory by Margaret Scotford Archer

culture and agency archer margaret s

Reflexivity as the unacknowledged condition of social life 10. It is also the way of avoiding the transposition of this experience into a theoretical stance which embraces its eternal duality but then ends up unable to specify under what conditions we are condemned to reproduce our culture versus which conditions allow us the freedom to transform it Those who endorse the' duality of culture', rather than analytical dualism, then simply oscillate between the two, insisting on both but unable to tell us when one rather than the other will predominate. Instead what happens is that autonomy is withheld from both 'parts' and 'people' and this has precisely the same effect of precluding any examination of their interplay. Nevertheless the structural and cultural domains are substantively very different, as well as being relatively autonomous from one another. To assert that the two are relatively autonomous is to say nothing about their relative importance for social stability and change at any given time. Similarly causal cohesion will now be termed Socio-Cultural integration.

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SAGE Journals: Your gateway to world

culture and agency archer margaret s

The net effect of this insistence on cultural compactness was that it precluded any theory of cultural development springing from internal dynamics. Likewise the initial antecedently existing structure was itself the outcome of structural elaboration resulting from the action of prior agents. Reference Archer,M 2014 The generative mechanism re-configuring late modernity. In the structural domain the theoretical framework which is most explicitly based on analytical dualism is the morphogenetic approach. Originating at the descriptive level, the Myth created an archetype of culture s as the perfectly woven and all-enmeshing web, the intricate construction of which only added to its strength. As at its origins it continues to draw its power from the elision of Cultural System integration with Socio-Cultural integration. While recognizing the interdependence of structure and agency i.

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Margaret Archer

culture and agency archer margaret s

The second means that theories developed about the relationship between structures and social agents and between cultures and cultural actors have to recognize the relative autonomy of structure and culture. At each of the four points it has been seen that there is a common defect- the lack of any distinction between properties of the Cultural System and the features of Socio- Cultural integration. Once again the net effect of conflation is that the possibility of gaining explanatory leverage on cultural dynamics from the interplay between' parts' and'people' is relinquished from the outset On analytical dualism In contradistinction to every version of conflation in social theory is the approach endorsed here, which is based four-square on analytical dualism. Once again the effect is systematically to deprive cultural inconsistency of any social or theoretical significance - not by arguing that such contradictions are unsensed but by contending that they are 'merely 5 sensed, that is they are apparent rather than real. The final step, then, is to argue that the question 'when does structure exert more influence over culture and vice versa? But, as Gellner argues, the trouble with such all-embracing logical charity is. In fact, the assumption has not been acceded to universally.

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