Legal institutions and collective memories. Legal Institutions and Collective Memories: Susanne Karstedt: Hart Publishing 2019-03-16

Legal institutions and collective memories Rating: 7,2/10 600 reviews

Legal Institutions and Collective Memories by Susan Karstedt (9781841133263)

legal institutions and collective memories

This volume, a welcome addition to the literature, contributes comprehensive historical, sociological, and legal perspectives to this important dialogue. By placing African American histories and memories of slave breeding within the larger context of America's history of racial and gender discrimination, Smithers sheds much-needed light on African American collective memory, racialized perceptions of fragile black families, and the long history of racially motivated violence against men, women, and children of color. Together these chapters contribute fresh insights through innovative research, furthering the discussion on the theological and historical importance of these texts within the canon. The book thus connects the social response to the legal theory and practice, and trials in particular. Building upon the work of Maurice Halbwachs, this collection of essays emphasises the extended role and active involvement of contemporary law and legal institutions in public discourse about the past, and explores their impact on the shape that collective memories take in the course of time. The chapters in this volume features evidence from other, less-frequently studied texts, so as to broaden perspectives on early Christian identity. These include transitional trials as 'monumental spectacles' as well as constitutional courts, and the restitution of property rights in Central and Eastern Europe and Australia.

Next

Legal Institutions and Collective Memories(Oñati International Series in Law and Society): Susanne Karstedt: Hart Publishing

legal institutions and collective memories

What are the most effective steps to be taken to ensure that the past is not repeated? They explore the role of law and legal institutions in linking individual and collective memories in the transitional period through processes of lustration, and they analyse divided memories about the past and their impact on future reconciliation in South Africa. He extensively examines legal options for domestic criminal accountability and discusses both retributive prosecutions and restorative justice mainly truth commission mechanisms, being the main legal responses to the gross violations of human rights. The book discusses whether a stand-alone crime of political genocide should be recognized under international law. What are the influences of these texts on later Christian identity? The authors uncover a complex pattern of searching for truth, negotiating the past and cultivating the art of forgetting. The essays cover a broad range of legal institutions, countries and topics. While RtoP in some aspects may reinforce or reiterate existing law, its strength lies in the framework it establishes — unearthing, interpreting, and crystallising the obligation to act in the face of mass atrocity crimes.

Next

Legal Institutions and Collective Memories by Susan Karstedt (9781841133263)

legal institutions and collective memories

Since the historic Nuremberg Trial of 1945 an international customary law principle has developed that commission of a core crime under international law - war crimes, genocide, crimes against humanity and aggression - should not go unpunished. The Destruction of Memory—now available in this accessible, pocket edition—reveals the extent to which a nation weds itself to its landscape. As in action or horror movies, the script dictates how the 'hero' acts. And how was friendship performed and those performances interpreted in diplomatic, social, and cultural contexts? The authors uncover a complex pattern of searching for truth, negotiating the past and cultivating the art of forgetting. How does a society pay tribute to and provide reparations for individual victims? Its argument is that narratives of insecurity powerful horror stories people tell and believe about their world and others can easily make extreme acts appear acceptable, even necessary and heroic. The article also seeks to encourage a deeper, serious, and more meaningful engagement with Native American environmental knowledge and social practices to more effectively meet the environmental challenges confronting Native and non-Native peoples alike in twenty-first-century North America. What is the remit of such obligations for the State and to what extent do these differ for each of the four crimes? In recent decades the debate among scholars, lawyers, politicians and others about how societies deal with their past has been constant and intensive.

Next

Legal Institutions and Collective Memories : Susan Karstedt : 9781841133270

legal institutions and collective memories

Their contributions explore the ambiguous and intricate links between the production of justice, truth and memory. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards. Since 2005 the idea that each State has a responsibility to protect its own population from genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing has been embraced by the international community in the principle of Responsibility to Protect RtoP. They explore the role of law and legal institutions in linking individual and collective memories in the transitional period through processes of lustration, and they analyse divided memories about the past and their impact on future reconciliation in South Africa. These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Typically absent from these claims is a critical interrogation of what collective memory is, whether it is necessarily benevolent or even whether the deliberate construction of such a collective memory is a legitimate function of legal process. These include transitional trials as 'monumental spectacles' as well as constitutional courts, and the restitution of property rights in Central and Eastern Europe and Australia.

Next

Legal Institutions and Collective Memories by Susan Karstedt (9781841133263)

legal institutions and collective memories

Coser, this translation will be an indispensable source for new research in historical sociology and cultural memory. This volume, the first comprehensive English-language translation of Halbwach's writings on the social construction of memory, fills a major gap in the literature on the sociology of knowledge. Building upon the work of Maurice Halbwachs, this collection of essays emphasises the extended role and active involvement of contemporary law and legal institutions in public discourse about the past, and explores their impact on the shape that collective memories take in the course of time. The structure of the police started to change due to the increasing demand not in the power but in the management decisions. It backs its argument with a large number of case studies covering four continents, written by prominent scholars from the relevant countries or with deep knowledge of them. In this bold and provocative book, historian Gregory Smithers investigates how African Americans have narrated, remembered, and represented slave-breeding practices. Finally, the book discusses new tendencies in Israeli culture that are suggestive to Jewish-Israeli identity in the age of globalization.

Next

Legal institutions and collective memories

legal institutions and collective memories

The authors uncover a complex pattern of searching for truth, negotiating the past and cultivating the art of forgetting. The collection offers a genuinely comparative approach, allied to cutting-edge theory. The authors uncover a complex pattern of searching for truth, negotiating the past and cultivating the art of forgetting. These questions have become staples for advocates and scholars in the human rights community, both at the local and international level, and several impressive texts dedicated to these issues have been produced. They explore the role of law and legal institutions in linking individual and collective memories in the transitional period through processes of lustration, and they analyse divided memories about the past and their impact on future reconciliation in South Africa. The encroaching Anglo settler frontier from the east and pressure from the Spanish, the French, and hostile Native warriors from the north all prompted changes in how Cherokee people represented themselves to outsiders. In her book, Caroline Fournet examines the law relating to genocide and explores the apparent failure of society to provide an adequate response to incidences of mass atrocity.

Next

Legal Institutions and Collective Memories: Susanne Karstedt: Hart Publishing

legal institutions and collective memories

It then demonstrates that other international offences - notably crimes against humanity and war crimes - are not workable substitutes for a specific offence that protects political groups. How does a society heal the collective trauma and devastation caused by brutality and atrocities? In the spirit of this road map, the author analyzes the post-election violence in Kenya from a legal point of view. The essays cover a broad range of legal institutions, countries and topics. Certain fundamental questions have recently surfaced in the wake of systemic brutality and extreme atrocities that constitute war crimes, crimes against humanity, and gross violations of human rights. The essays cover a broad range of legal institutions, countries and topics. Building upon the work of Maurice Halbwachs, this collection of essays emphasises the extended role and active involvement of contemporary law and legal institutions in public discourse about the past, and explores their impact on the shape that collective memories take in the course of time. How does the author frame or shape identity? Cite the publication as Karstedt, Susanne, 2009.

Next

Legal institutions and collective memories (Book, 2009) [refinery29.co.uk]

legal institutions and collective memories

This is followed by an analytical study of the protection of human groups under international law. The essays cover a broad range of legal institutions, countries and topics. Halbwachs' primary thesis is that human memory can only function within a collective context. This article draws on colonial archives, missionary records, ethnographic travel writing, and the written and oral traditions of the Cherokee people to explore the importance of friendship among Cherokees in the Native South. The essays cover a broad range of legal institutions, countries and topics.

Next

Legal Institutions and Collective Memories by Susan Karstedt (9781841133263)

legal institutions and collective memories

Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. The authors uncover a complex pattern of searching for truth, negotiating the past and cultivating the art of forgetting. Abstract In recent decades the debate among scholars, lawyers, politicians and others about how societies deal with their past has been constant and intensive. In recent decades the debate among scholars, lawyers, politicians and others about how societies deal with their past has been constant and intensive. Legal Institutions and Collective Memories engages with such dilemmas in 17 essays which include descriptive case studies and more abstract reflections on memory, justice, truth and transition.

Next